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CWE-341: Predictable from Observable State

 
Predictable from Observable State
Weakness ID: 341 (Weakness Base)Status: Draft
+ Description

Description Summary

A number or object is predictable based on observations that the attacker can make about the state of the system or network, such as time, process ID, etc.
+ Time of Introduction
  • Architecture and Design
  • Implementation
+ Applicable Platforms

Languages

All

+ Common Consequences
ScopeEffect

Technical Impact: Varies by context

This weakness could be exploited by an attacker in a number ways depending on the context. If a predictable number is used to generate IDs or keys that are used within protection mechanisms, then an attacker could gain unauthorized access to the system. If predictable filenames are used for storing sensitive information, then an attacker might gain access to the system and may be able to gain access to the information in the file.

+ Demonstrative Examples

Example 1

This code generates a unique random identifier for a user's session.

(Bad Code)
Example Language: PHP 
function generateSessionID($userID){
srand($userID);
return rand();
}

Because the seed for the PRNG is always the user's ID, the session ID will always be the same. An attacker could thus predict any user's session ID and potentially hijack the session.

This example also exhibits a Small Seed Space (CWE-339).

+ Observed Examples
ReferenceDescription
Mail server stores private mail messages with predictable filenames in a world-executable directory, which allows local users to read private mailing list archives.
PRNG allows attackers to use the output of small PRNG requests to determine the internal state information, which could be used by attackers to predict future pseudo-random numbers.
DNS resolver library uses predictable IDs, which allows a local attacker to spoof DNS query results.
MFV. predictable filename and insecure permissions allows file modification to execute SQL queries.
+ Potential Mitigations

Phase: Implementation

Increase the entropy used to seed a PRNG.

Phases: Architecture and Design; Requirements

Strategy: Libraries or Frameworks

Use products or modules that conform to FIPS 140-2 [R.341.1] to avoid obvious entropy problems. Consult FIPS 140-2 Annex C ("Approved Random Number Generators").

Phase: Implementation

Use a PRNG that periodically re-seeds itself using input from high-quality sources, such as hardware devices with high entropy. However, do not re-seed too frequently, or else the entropy source might block.

+ Relationships
NatureTypeIDNameView(s) this relationship pertains toView(s)
ChildOfWeakness ClassWeakness Class330Use of Insufficiently Random Values
Development Concepts (primary)699
Research Concepts (primary)1000
ChildOfCategoryCategory905SFP Cluster: Predictability
Software Fault Pattern (SFP) Clusters (primary)888
MemberOfViewView884CWE Cross-section
CWE Cross-section (primary)884
PeerOfWeakness BaseWeakness Base339Small Seed Space in PRNG
Research Concepts1000
+ Taxonomy Mappings
Mapped Taxonomy NameNode IDFitMapped Node Name
PLOVERPredictable from Observable State
+ References
[R.341.1] [REF-1] Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology. "SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR CRYPTOGRAPHIC MODULES". 2001-05-25. <http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/fips/fips140-2/fips1402.pdf>.
[R.341.2] [REF-17] Michael Howard, David LeBlanc and John Viega. "24 Deadly Sins of Software Security". "Sin 20: Weak Random Numbers." Page 299. McGraw-Hill. 2010.
+ Content History
Submissions
Submission DateSubmitterOrganizationSource
Externally Mined
Modifications
Modification DateModifierOrganizationSource
2008-07-01CigitalExternal
updated Time_of_Introduction
2008-09-08MITREInternal
updated Relationships, Taxonomy_Mappings
2009-03-10MITREInternal
updated Potential_Mitigations
2009-12-28MITREInternal
updated Potential_Mitigations
2010-06-21MITREInternal
updated Potential_Mitigations
2011-06-01MITREInternal
updated Common_Consequences
2011-06-27MITREInternal
updated Common_Consequences
2011-09-13MITREInternal
updated Potential_Mitigations, References
2012-05-11MITREInternal
updated Common_Consequences, Demonstrative_Examples, Observed_Examples, References, Relationships
2012-10-30MITREInternal
updated Potential_Mitigations
Page Last Updated: June 23, 2014